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Amid the furore of ' a crazy cop' little was said or printed about the police manipulating and twisting evidence to get convictions -- using criminal records on other people, who were particularly vulnerable, to beef up a thin case when they were quite aware they lacked real evidence.

THE 1970's were a playground for unaccountable cops and cops that turned a blind eye to what other cops did in the 'misconduct' arena.

Paymaster and tycoon, a man called Benson, paid the officers to inform him of raids and if necessary, make evidence disappear. He teamed up with 'racing swindler ' William Kurr and together they issued ' Le-Sport ' which included many references to the wealthy Mr.

Yonge who lived in a mansion on Shanklin, the Isle-of-Wight.

Firstly they gave the reason it was bad for business, then on the grounds it would sour relations.

This might shock, but it is a fact the tip of the iceberg and not a full picture of police corruption --- it goes much deeper than those figures and encompasses all ranks -- as you will see if you go to ' The Bent Cops' list, which is just a snapshot of what we have in our files. Although the Police Force was in it's formative years and malpractice was a regular event, the conviction of four senior officers for taking bribes caused the public to doubt the integrity of a force that should have been law abiding.Meiklejohn warned Benson and Kurr that nosey cop Chief Inspector Clarke was getting ready to pounce.Yonge entered the plan, and got Clarke to visit him on the Isle - of - Wight. This turned later and Yonge said he'd paid 50 to Clarke.An investigation began immediately into Stephen Ward -- with instructions to 'find something and everything useful no matter how trivial' The CID were employed headed by CHIEF INSPECTOR SAMUEL HERBERT and DETECTIVE SERGEANT JOHN BURROWS, who chose DETECTIVE SERGEANT ARTHUR EUSTACE and DETECTIVE SERGEANT MICHAEL GLASSE who were considered as 'The Hunters' -- this special team of four were assembled and briefed by COMMANDER FRED C. DETECTIVE SUPERINTENDENT JAMES AXON was in charge of the 'field-work' and made the prolonged search for any evidence that would tilt the scales towards Ward.Burrows and Eustace said (25yrs later), the case and investigation was not normal police practice as one usually investigated the circumstances after a crime had been committed, but this one was to 'invent a crime and find things to support it' Apart from this, everything found had to be logged and the Prime Minister had to be kept informed and receive copies of all the evidence and reports-- ' A closed copy for his eyes only' They realised they were being employed to go on 'a fishing expedition' to justify an expected catalogue of charges ---'Go and find one that will stick in a court of law' was the order from the Met Chief.The papers centred on the madness he showed before going on trial and this helped to cloud many truths of certain squads.

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